Category: Economy

[Podcast] From Emergency Services to Permanent Solutions: Addressing Youth Homelessness

Stephen Gaetz discusses the problem of youth homelessness and how we can develop permanent solutions

Screen shot 2014-06-11 at 7.47.30 AMListen to the program. Subscribe to the weekly podcast.

One in five shelter users are youth. 25 to 40% of youth experiencing homelessness self-identified as LGBTQ, and 40 to 70% of homeless youth have mental health issues compared to 10 to 20% of housed youth.

On the program, we discuss the crisis of youth homelessness in Canada and how we might better respond to the problem, as well as the broader context of Canadian homelessness and the structural dimensions fuelling the situation.

Dr. Stephen Gaetz is associate professor in the faculty of education at York University in Toronto and he is the director of the Canadian Homelessness Research Network. He is the author of a new report – Coming of Age: Reimaging the Response to Youth Homelessness in Canada.

 

[Podcast] ‘A Government Systematically Undermining Public Confidence in Public Education’

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Longtime public education advocate Jane Bouey on the teachers’ strike, the state of public schools in Vancouver and BC, and the Public Education Project

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What is the state of public education in Vancouver and BC schools? Why do class size and composition matter? What is the context of the current teachers’ strike and the lockout initiated by the BC government?

In an in-depth conversation, former Vancouver School Board Trustee Jane Bouey discusses the state of public education in BC and Vancouver, provides the context to the current strike and lockout, and gives an update on the Vancouver School Board’s work on updating their sexual orientation and gender identity policies. A recent Georgia Straight article details the VSB’s work on updating these policies and the organized backlash that Jane Bouey describes.

Jane Bouey also explains the importance of local public education activism – and the yet-to-be-launched Public Education Project which aims to bring  public education issues to the fore in Vancouver municipal politics.

The Public Education Project has yet to launch their website, but if you are interested in finding out more you can contact Jane Bouey by email or Twitter.

[Podcast] The Best and Worst Place to be a Woman in Canada

Listen to find out why Quebec City came out on the top of the list. Photo by 1979stl [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons.

A recent study examines gender equality across Canada’s largest metro areas

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The Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives released a new report – The Best and Worst Place to be a Woman in Canada: An Index of Gender Equality in Canada’s Twenty Largest Metropolitan Areas. Which cities have greater gender equality?

On the podcast, we discuss the findings with the author of this recent study. Kate McInturff is a senior researcher at the CCPA and director of Making Women Count – an initiative on gender equality and public policy.

Don’t let another bookstore close! Vancouver losing critical cultural and intellectual infrastructure

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The People’s Co-op Bookstore is under threat of closing. They sent out this email on April 9th:

 

Dear Friend of People´s Co-op Bookstore


I am writing on behalf of People´s Co-op Bookstore to urge you to help save the Co-op – the oldest independent bookstore in Vancouver.

The Bookstore will close unless we raise a minimum of 15,000 dollars before the end of June. And another 15,000 before December. It’s essential that we eliminate existing debt and increase our new stock .

The good news is an anonymous donor will donate $1 for every $2 you donate up to a total of $5,000.

Your donation will help this important bookstore survive. Our goal is to build a strong progressive children´s book section and increase our traditional book stock. Another goal is to make the bookstore a friendly and comfortable hub for a range of progressive, literary and other activities in our City and neighborhood.

I hope you agree that People´s Co-op bookstore has an invaluable role to play in Vancouver, and our neighbourhood. It is a critical place to support labour, left, progressive causes, co-operatives, and local poets and writers.

You may have seen us selling books at community events. We recently sold books at the Arundhati Roy event. We plan to do more. And we will hold more book launches. We have already begun a children´s story time on Saturday morning.

Please help save an independent bookstore that provides critical material not easily found in other book stores., Progressive people need to support writers, and ideas. To have a place where people can gather. To challenge the Stephen Harper’s and Christy Clark’s of the world.

I’ve attached a dynamic roadmap for the the bookstores future (I hope you’ll take a moment to read it and I hope you’ll make a donation today.

Ways you can help:

– Please make the biggest donation you can. Large or small, your donation helps.

– Become a Co-op member ($25) if you are not already one.

– Upgrade your Co-op membership to a one year $25.00 membership and receive a 10% discount. Your donation of $250 entitles you to a 10% lifetime discount.

– Donate books to the bookstore.

– Volunteer on a committee, work in the bookstore or assist in off-site sales.

– Distribute this appeal to your email lists and Facebook friends.

I hope, like me, you believe that this bookstore is important to the people of Vancouver. And I hope you will help save it. Please send your donation to the People´s Co-op Bookstore at 1391 Commercial Dr., Vancouver, V6L 3X5 or phone the bookstore (604-253-6442) to make a credit card donation. (Online donations are not yet available.)

In solidarity and with much thanks for your support,

Brian Campbell Chair, Fundraising Committee

PS. Don’t let another bookstore close. And please don’t let a thinkers and activists progressive bookstore close. You and other people in our community working together can save it, and more importantly, help it to grow and bring progressive ideas too many more people. As the forces of conservatism grow stronger, it’s important to fight back with books, ideas, and a community space. The People’s co-op bookstore, is critical to this fight.

[Podcast] When Commodities Stop Flowing: The Significance of the Truckers’ Strike and Vancouver’s Port

Vancouver’s container port on Burrard Inlet. Source: Ze Moufette (http://www.flickr.com/people/78154062@N02). Wikimedia Commons.

A regularized employment model for port trucking would entail slightly higher costs for shippers and carriers that might be passed on to consumers. But for the residents of this region, that is a price worth paying. When truckers bear the risks of supply-chain uncertainty, we pay the costs.                    Dr. Peter V. Hall (Simon Fraser University) in the Vancouver Sun

What are the conditions that have led to the current labour situation at Canada’s largest port? And what is the significance of Vancouver’s port within wider global supply chains? How are we to understand the complexities of Vancouver’s port and logistics?

On the program, Dr. Peter V. Hall discusses the current labour situation involving port truckers and the complexities of global commodity chains, ports, and port cities like Vancouver.

Peter V. Hall is associate professor of urban studies at Simon Fraser University, and his research examines port cities, seaports, and logistics. He is intersted in the connections between shipping and logistics networks, the port institutions that govern and regulate them, and the resulting patterns of employment and development in port cities.

[Podcast] Approved Downtown Eastside Plan Raises Gentrification and Social Housing Concerns

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Vancouver’s recently approved Downtown Eastside neighbourhood plan has raised concerns over the definition of social housing and the plan’s ability to stop – or even slow – gentrification. Low-income advocates and others expressed frustration that the significant 30-year plan was rushed through City Council.

On the podcast, we hear from low-income advocate Tamara Herman (Carnegie Community Action Project), Vancouver Mayor Gregor Robertson (courtesy of City Hall Watch), Green Party Councillor Adriane Carr, and urban planning/geography PhD  student and researcher Melissa Fong.

[Podcast] Celebration Capitalism and the Olympic Games

Capitalism_OlympicsJules Boykoff on celebration capitalism, dissent, and the Olympic Games in Vancouver, London, and Sochi

Jules Boykoff discusses the Olympics Games – prominent urban mega-event spectacles – as a form of ‘celebration capitalism’ (the complement to Naomi Klein’s disaster capitalism). He talks about celebration capitalism and political dissent in the context of the Vancouver, London, and Sochi Olympic Games.

Jules Boykoff is author of Celebration Capitalism and the Olympic Games (2013) and Activism and the Olympics: Dissent at the Games in Vancouver and London (forthcoming), “Fun at the Games: The Anti-Olympics” (New Left Review, 2011) among many other publications in both academic and popular publications. He is associate professor of politics and government at Pacific University in Oregon.

[Podcast] Vancouver: Consumption City Forever?

Photo by Andy Longhurst

Photo by Andy Longhurst

Part two of the conversation with urban economic geographer Elliot Siemiatycki about Vancouver’s future economic trajectory

On the program, the second part of the conversation with urban economic geographer Elliot Siemiatycki about Vancouver’s transformation from a productive city into a city of consumption, dominated increasingly by real estate and tourism. We discuss what the future might hold for Vancouver as a city of consumption – and whether it might be advantageous for the city to chart an alternative economic path forward.

Dr. Elliot Siemiatycki is a postdoctoral fellow at York University in Toronto, and he completed his PhD from the University of British Columbia in 2013. His PhD research examined Vancouver’s urban economic transformation over the last three decades in his dissertation – Consumption City: Precarious Labour and Capital in Vancouver, British Columbia. 

[Podcast] Vancouver: Consumption City

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Trump Tower Vancouver construction. Photo by Andy Longhurst.

Economic geographer Elliot Siemiatycki discusses Vancouver’s transformation from a productive city into a city of consumption

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Above all, the many paradoxes of Vancouver’s contemporary economic development trajectory are exposed in the words of local workers, firms, commentators and industry experts: Vancouver is simultaneously the most livable and unaffordable city in the world; Vancouver is a leading creative city in which creative firms and workers alike struggle under conditions of precariousness; Vancouver is mythologized as a healthy, sustainable, lifestyle city while these very qualities often must be sacrificed by working Vancouver residents. Tracing the underlying story and challenges of Vancouver’s emergence as a global consumption city provides important insights into 21st century urban development.                           –Elliot Siemiatycki, PhD

On the podcast, urban economic geographer Elliot Siemiatycki discusses Vancouver’s transformation from a productive city into a city of consumption, dominated increasingly by real estate and tourism. We examine how the city’s structure, feel, and image of itself have shifted over the last three decades – and how the rise of precarious employment is implicated in this transformation.

Dr. Elliot Siemiatycki is a postdoctoral fellow at York University in Toronto, and he completed his PhD from the University of British Columbia in 2013. His PhD research examined Vancouver’s urban economic transformation over the last three decades in his dissertation – Consumption City: Precarious Labour and Capital in Vancouver, British Columbia. 

[Podcast] A New Era? Bill de Blasio and the Shifting Political Landscape in New York City

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On the podcast, John Mollenkopf, Distinguished Professor at the City University of New York, reflects on Michael Bloomberg’s three terms as mayor of New York City and what the election of  Bill de Blasio means for the city. Bill de Blasio is the first Democratic mayor elected since 1993 and won the mayoral election by a landslide, receiving over 73% of the vote. We discuss issues of inequality, affordable housing, immigration, and urban development – as well as the shifting landscape of electoral politics in America’s largest city.

Dr. Mollenkopf is a Distinguished Professor of Political Science and Sociology at the City University of New York Graduate Center and is director of the Center for Urban Research. He is a renowned urban scholar on New York City’s politics and has authored or edited fifteen books on urban politics, urban policy, immigration, and New York City. Prior to joining the Graduate Center in 1981, he directed the Economic Development Division of the New York City Department of City Planning.